During this public consultation, participants were asked to review the responses put forward by the Devon Climate Emergency partnership to the resolutions and conditions passed by the Devon Climate Assembly.

In May 2019, a partnership formed to respond to the climate and ecological emergency in Devon (including the areas of Plymouth and Torbay). The partnership includes public bodies, private sector interests, environmental organisations and academic institutions.  

The Devon Climate Emergency partnership is producing and delivering the Devon Carbon Plan, guided by the Net-Zero Task Force, to help achieve net-zero carbon emissions in Devon by 2050.  

Following a period of evidence gathering by the Net-Zero Task Force (Figure 1), involving a range of public engagement, an Interim Devon Carbon Plan (IDCP) was produced. The IDCP was published for public consultation in December 2020. Whilst it set out many of the things which Devon must do in order to achieve net-zero, it also included issues which the Task Force felt needed further public deliberation by a Citizens’ Assembly.  

Figure 1: flow chart showing the carbon plan process
Figure 1. The Carbon Plan progress

The partnership held a Climate Assembly in the summer of 2021, during which seventy randomly-selected individuals, representative of Devon’s population, were invited to discuss three of Devon’s key climate issues: onshore wind, transport and buildings.  

The Assembly came up with resolutions and conditions, which were presented to the Devon Climate Emergency Partnership in early autumn 2021 in a report.  The report includes a breakdown of the voting results and the supporting statements prepared by members for each resolution, condition and supporting recommendation.   

The organizations of the Devon Climate Emergency partnership worked together to respond to the Assembly’s recommendations, including proposing actions to include in the Devon Carbon Plan. A public consultation presented the partnership’s response  and asked the public have we responded fairly and correctly to the Devon Climate Assembly? This was to ensure that the additional actions proposed to be added to the Devon Carbon Plan are fair, democratic and contribute to achieving net-zero.  

This report presents the findings of the consultation and states the amendments that will be made to the partnership’s responses in light of the consultation findings.  

The partnership will now incorporate its responses into the Final Devon Carbon Plan ready for endorsement by Devon’s organisations from August 2022.  

211 responses were received from 201 individuals and 10 organisations. They were received from all local authority areas in Devon and across all age ranges. However, responses from Plymouth, Torbay, North Devon and from younger residents were underrepresented, despite targeted communications.  

Engagement in this consultation was lower than previous consultations the partnership has held, even though publicity efforts were enhanced in some aspects. This is likely due to the development of the Devon Carbon Plan now being in its later stages, and the scope of this consultation being more focused than previous engagement opportunities.  

The consultation results show that the partnership’s responses to the Devon Climate Assembly have clear public support, as all but one of the partnership’s proposals to the Assembly’s resolutions have more than 50% of respondents to this consultation in agreement with them. 

The respondents, like the Assembly members, are keen to see action to support renewable energy in Devon, including onshore wind under the right conditions, with the need for community-benefit being emphasised.  

There is backing for enhanced requirements for building retrofit, if accompanied with sufficient financial support.  

And there is appetite for changes in the way Devon travels, so long as there are improved sustainable travel options and electric vehicles available, particularly in rural areas.  

Underpinning the responses in the consultation were messages that whilst people want to see change happen quickly in response to the emergency, changes must be inclusive and should not increase disadvantage for any community. Particular concern was voiced about the potential impact on rural, low income and disabled citizens.  

Fewer than 50% of the respondents to this consultation agreed with the partnership’s proposal not to introduce ‘financial sticks’, such as parking charges, congestion charges and workplace parking levies. The most common theme in the comments, submitted by 13 respondents, was that these measures should be implemented in light of the climate emergency, despite them not being supported by a majority of the Assembly members. 

The findings of this consultation will inform how the partnership incorporates the resolutions and conditions of the Devon Climate Assembly into the Final Devon Carbon Plan. 

3.1 Timing  

The consultation was open from the 17th March to the 14th April 2022 for a period of 4 weeks.  

3.2 Availability  

The consultation text and questionnaires were available online as web pages and downloadable PDF documents.  

Print copies of the consultation text, the Interim Devon Carbon Plan and the consultation questionnaire were distributed to Devon’s libraries. These documents were also available by post and could be requested via phone or email. 

3.3 Promotion Methods  

Promotional materials for the consultation were developed in collaboration with colleagues in the Devon County Council communications team, who reviewed messaging, layout and contributed to the development of specific target audiences. Three short videos were also showed to secondary school students at Notre Dame School in Plymouth, whose feedback was incorporated into the final versions. 

The consultation was promoted on the Devon Climate Emergency’s Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and Twitter accounts. A promotional pack including a blog post, a poster and social media content was sent to partner organisations. Paid advertising was used on Instagram and Facebook to target three key audiences: 1) those already engaged, 2) high-carbon consumers, and 3) those who would not normally take a significant interest in environmental or climate issues. Organisations beyond the partnership that would have a particular interest, such as farming organisations, were reached out to on social media.  

Print adverts were run weekly in the Mid Devon Gazette, the Herald Express, the Express & Echo, North Devon Gazette, Plymouth Herald and the Western Morning News. The print advert was also displayed on In Your Area – a local news website. This way, we were able to ensure we were covering many of the geographical regions of Devon. The opportunity was marketed in partner newsletters and news releases were issued. 

We held an online webinar for members of the public to learn more about the consultation. 20 people attended the webinar, a recording of which can be seen on the Devon Climate Emergency YouTube Channel.   

Digital posters were also produced and sent to library staff to be printed and displayed, advertising the promotion to library users. 

Respondents were asked how they heard about the consultation. Figure 2 shows that community newsletters were the single most common way that people heard about the consultation (32% of respondents). This underscores the importance of continuing to grow our newsletter through events and online communications, as well as the partner organisations sharing updates through their newsletters.  

13% of people learnt of the consultation through Facebook, which made it the most significant social media channel for outreach, followed by Twitter at 7%. Only 1% of people who responded heard about it through Instagram or LinkedIn, which is fewer people than saw an advert in a newspaper (3%). Word of mouth proved important, as 7% of people were alerted to the consultation this way.  

However, 36% of people responded “other” and were given the opportunity to share further detail. Additional ways in which people indicated they heard about the consultation include the radio, the app “Nextdoor”, the library, at a meeting, through an email directly sent to them or through websites, particularly local authority websites. Further detail on how people told us they heard about the consultation is listed in appendix 1.  

a pie chart showing how people heard about the consultation
Figure 2: A pie chart showing how people heard about the consultation

3.4 The Questionnaires

Initially we designed one comprehensive questionnaire which provided an opportunity for consultees to respond to every resolution and condition put forward by the Devon Climate Assembly. This questionnaire took 45 minutes to complete. Prior to the launch of the consultation we received feedback that the length of this questionnaire could be off-putting to consultees. In response, we developed a shorter questionnaire that took 15 minutes to complete. This included only the responses to the Assembly’s resolutions, not the more detailed conditions. Consultees were able to complete whichever version of the questionnaire best suited them.   

We received 211 responses. The responses were received in the following ways: 

  • 41 responses to the 45-minute questionnaire; 
  • 168 responses to the 15-minute questionnaire; 
  • 2 responses via the paper version, which included the same questions as the 45 minute questionnaire. 

Website analytics show that 22% of people who landed on the webpage of the 45-minute questionnaire completed it, and 45% of people who landed on the webpage of the 15-minute questionnaire completed it. This is an excellent ‘conversion rate’ – anything above 5% is generally considered very successful from marketing campaigns. 

5.1 Organisations 

Responses were received from 10 organisations, making up 5% of responses.  

Question 1.1.a Which organisation do you represent? 

A variety of organisations responded to the consultation, including: Parish Councils, community groups, a church, environmental campaign groups, and a public sector organisation which is not a local authority. 

The full list of organisations that responded is: 

  • Chardstock Parish Council
  • Dittisham Parish Council
  • Exeter Cycling Campaign
  • Inclusive Totnes
  • Lyn Climate Action
  • Natural England
  • North Devon and Torridge Climate Forum
  • St Mary’s Church, Bideford
  • Sustainable Dittisham
  • One response identified as an organisation but did not name the organisation. 

Question 1.1.b What type of organisation are you responding on behalf of? 

Organisations that responded were mostly community groups or public sector organisations.  

Type of organisation Number of responses 
A business 
A community group 
A local authority 
A public sector organisation which is not a local authority 
A social enterprise 
Total 9 
Table 1: Responses to question 1.1.b What type of organisation are you responding on behalf of?

Question 1.1.c How many people are in the organisation you are representing? 

Respondents represented various sizes of organisations. Table 2 shows the number of responses within each bracket of organisation size. 

The size of the organisation  The number of responses 
0-25 
251-5000 
26-50 
51-250 
Total 10 
Table 2. Responses to question 1.1.c How many people are in the organisation you are representing? 

Question 1.1.d In which area of Devon is your organisation based? 

Organisations did not responded from all of Devon’s local authority areas, see Table 3.  

Area of Devon The number of organisations responding 
City of Exeter 
East Devon 
North Devon 
South Hams 
Torridge 
Total 9 
Table 3. Responses to question 1.1.d, In which area of Devon is your organisation based? 

Question 1.1.e Is your organisation based within a national park in Devon? 

The majority of organisations who responded were not based within the national parks, see Table 4. 

Response Options 1.1.e Is your organisation based within a national park in Devon? 
No 
Yes, Exmoor National Park 
Total 
Table 4. Responses to question 1.1.e, Is your organisation based within a national park in Devon? 

Question 1.1.f Please select the first part of your organisation’s postcode from the list. 

The organisations which responded are located in dispersed postcodes, as can be seen from Table 5 and Figure 3. 

The first part of the respondent organisation’s postcode The number of organisations from within this postcode 
DT7 
EX1 
EX13 
EX31 
EX35 
EX39 
EX4 
TQ6 
TQ9 
Total 10 
Table 5.Responses to question 1.1.f, Please select the first part of your organisation’s postcode from the list. 
Figure 3: map of Devon
Figure 3. A map showing the areas in Devon from which organisations responded to the consultation, with a darker blue indicating a higher number of responses. 

5.2 Individuals 

Responses were received from 201 individuals, making up 95% of responses. 

Question 1.1.g Please select the answer which best represents your connection to Devon  

Most respondents stated that they live in Devon, see Figure 4.  

pie chart
Figure 4. Responses to question 1.1.g Please select the answer which best represents your connection to Devon 

Question 1.1.h In which area of Devon do you live? 

Table 6 shows the responses received by local authority area. Torbay, Plymouth and North Devon were under-represented in comparison to their population. Exeter, East Devon , Mid Devon and Teignbridge had higher response rates than would be expected based on their population.  

Question 1.1.i Do you live within a National Park in Devon? 

Responses were received from residents of both of Devon’s National Parks, Table 6. 

District, Unitary and National Park Authority East Devon Exeter Mid Devon North Devon Plymouth South Hams Teignbridge Torbay Torridge West Devon Dartmoor Exmoor 
 % of Total Population of Devon 12% 11% 7% 8% 22% 7% 11% 11% 6% 5% 3% 1% 
Responses by Area  45 34 27 10 14 39 14 11 
% of Total Responses by Area 22 % 17% 13% 5% 1% 7% 19% 1% 7% 5% 4% 2% 
Table 6. The number of respondents by the area of Devon they live in, including the National Parks, compared to the % of the total population of Devon who live in that area. 

Question 1.1.j Please select the first part of your postcode from the list. 

The first part of a respondent’s home or organisation postcode was recorded. The postcode area with the most responses was EX4 with 16, followed by TQ12 with 13. Figure 5 shows the comparative number of responses received by postcode area, with a darker blue indicating a higher number of responses.  

Figure 5
Figure 5 A map showing the comparative number of responses from individuals by postcode 

Question 1.2 Which age band are you in?   

As has been the case in previous consultations by the DCE partnership, the greatest response was from those over 65 years old, accounting for 38% of responses. Younger age groups were underrepresented despite the targeted communications to these age groups (Figure 6). Only 2% of respondents were 16-24.  

figure 6 pie chart
Figure 6  Pie chart showing the proportion of responses from each age group 

Question 1.3 Please select the gender you identify with 

Female respondents slightly outnumbered males in all age categories, except the over 65s. Overall, 51% of respondents were female and 43% male (Figure 7). Two responses selected ‘other’ and explained that this was because they were responding on behalf of a group or organisation. 

figure 7 pie chart
Figure 7. Pie chart showing the gender respondents identify with 

Question 1.4 How would you describe your ethnic origin? 

Respondents who described themselves as white accounted for 91% (Figure 8). The consultation responses underrepresent ethnically diverse communities, which make up 4% of Devon’s population. 2% of respondents described themselves as from Arab/British Arab (0.5%), Asian/British Asian (0.5%) and Mixed Heritage (1%).  

figure 8 pie chart
Figure 8. The self-identified ethnic origin of respondents, by percentage. 

5.3 Views on Climate Change

Question 2.1 How concerned are you about climate change? 

Respondents who are very or extremely concerned about climate change accounted for 86%, with a further 7% slightly concerned (Figure 9). Only 7% were not concerned at all.  

figure 9 pie chart
Figure 9. Pie chart showing how concerned respondents are about climate change 

Question 2.2 Is climate change more or less important to you than it was two years ago? 

63% of responses indicated that climate change is more important to them than it was two years ago, with just under half of responses saying it was “much more important” (Figure 10).  

figure 10 pie chart
Figure 10. Pie chart showing whether climate change is more or less important to respondents than it was two years ago. 

In this section we present the findings of the consultation. We state the Devon Climate Assembly’s resolutions and conditions along with the Devon Climate Emergency Partnership’s proposed response to each of them. Below each, we provide a table showing the percentage of respondents that answered Strongly Disagree, Disagree, Neutral, Agree and Strongly Agree (all tables total 100%). We also provide a brief summary of the recurring themes that arose in the comments made by the respondents, along with the number of respondents who shared the same opinion, which we have displayed in brackets. Where no comments are included for a particular resolution or condition, it indicates that there were no repeating themes amongst the comments rather than that no comments were received.  

6.1 Onshore Wind in Devon

We asked respondents the extent to which they agreed or disagreed with the Devon Climate Emergency Partnership’s proposed responses to the Devon Climate Assembly’s resolutions and conditions about the role onshore wind should play in Devon’s future energy mix.  

A) Onshore Wind Resolution 1: In principle, we support the development of more onshore wind turbines in Devon. 

Our Proposed Response: Action E1 in the Energy Supply chapter of the Interim Devon Carbon Plan (IDCP) proposes the development of an energy strategy, including assessments of the accessible renewable energy resource available in Devon. The partnership agrees that onshore wind should be part of Devon’s energy mix. Therefore, the supporting text to action E1 in the IDCP will be updated to state that wind will be included in the assessments. This will identify where wind installations could be built. 

The partnership is aware of the particular interest in how opinions on onshore wind vary across the county. Hence we have broken down the opinion on this Resolution by area, see Figure 11.  

figure 11 bar graph
Figure 11. Respondents’ opinion of the partnership’s response to the Assembly’s Onshore Wind Resolution 1, by area 
Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 12 
Disagree 
Neutral 
Agree 28 
Strongly Agree 53 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. The most frequent themes occurring in the comments were:  

  • Support for onshore wind because it’s quicker and cheaper to develop than other energy technologies  (14) 
  • Against onshore wind due to impacts on views, nature and the noise they create (8) 
  • Unconvinced of the energy generation potential and reliability of onshore wind. (8) 
  • Concern that wind turbines should be in the right place, taking account of ecological and landscape assessments and where the energy is needed. (6) 

B) Onshore Wind, Resolution 1, Condition 1.1: That there is good, clear, high quality information & education for communities (from an objective, trusted and credible source) about the need for action and the crisis nature of climate and energy needs: a) including putting forward an emergency local plan identifying potential sites and the potential benefits; and b) providing practical support for affected communities to understand the potential benefits, processes and challenges. 

Our Proposed Response (points a & b are addressed in the two subsequent responses): New action proposed, Cross Cutting Themes chapter: “Provide high quality, objective information and education for communities about the crisis nature of the climate emergency and the need for, and benefits of, renewable energy production.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 18 
Disagree 
Neutral 
Agree 21 
Strongly Agree 50 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. The most frequent themes occurring in the comments were:  

  • Education and information sharing about climate change and emissions reduction is really important (4) 

C) Onshore Wind Resolution 1, Condition 1.1.A: That there is good, clear, high quality information & education for communities (from an objective, trusted and credible source) about the need for action and the crisis nature of climate and energy needs: a) including putting forward an emergency local plan identifying potential sites and the potential benefits; and b) providing practical support for affected communities to understand the potential benefits, processes and challenges. 

Our Proposed Response (point b is responded to by a later response): New action proposed, Energy Supply chapter : “Identify suitable locations for renewable energy, informed by the emerging Land Use Framework and environmental and social sensitivities, ensuring community involvement, and look to allocate these in Local Plans as appropriate.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 16 
Disagree 
Neutral 
Agree 22 
Strongly Agree 54 

  The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response.

D) Onshore Wind, Resolution 1, Condition 1.1B: That there is good, clear, high quality information & education for communities (from an objective, trusted and credible source) about the need for action and the crisis nature of climate and energy needs: a) including putting forward an emergency local plan identifying potential sites and the potential benefits; and b) providing practical support for affected communities to understand the potential benefits, processes and challenges. 

Our Proposed Response (focusing on point b): New action proposed, Energy Supply chapter : “Provide practical support for communities wishing to develop their own energy infrastructure.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 14 
Disagree 
Neutral 
Agree 14 
Strongly Agree 59 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response.

E) Onshore Wind Resolution 1, Condition 1.2: That all reasonable measures are undertaken to minimise potential negative impacts on communities (for example the risk of impacts on house prices due to the proximity to a turbine) and wildlife in the design and positioning of a windfarm, and there are opportunities built in for people to raise and seek redress for negative effects, should they occur, throughout the lifetime of its operation. 

Our Proposed Response: No action required because this condition is already addressed by the IDCP. 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 28 
Agree 17 
Strongly Agree 44 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. 

F) Onshore Wind Resolution 1, Condition 1.3: That the developments bring lasting local financial, economic, social and environmental benefits, with community ownership and Community Interest Companies held accountable for the distribution of funds. 

Our Proposed Response: New action proposed, Energy Supply chapter : “Local Plan updates will look to include policies that give positive weight to renewable and low carbon energy initiatives which have clear evidence of local community involvement and leadership.” This wording reflects existing Planning Practice Guidance. Going further than this would risk planning decisions being overturned or Local Plans being found to be unsound by planning inspectors. 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 11 
Disagree 
Neutral 11 
Agree 30 
Strongly Agree 41 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response.

G) Onshore Wind Resolution 1, Condition 1.4: That everyone across Devon understands where wind farms can be sited and can easily access information on potential impacts on a range of conditions (including mental health, wildlife, economy) and the range of potential benefits (e.g. lower cost electricity, reduced carbon emissions and impacts on climate change). 

Our Proposed Response: Incorporated into Response B, Cross Cutting Themes chapter , “Provide high quality, objective information and education for communities about the crisis nature of the climate emergency and the need for, and benefits of, renewable energy production.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 13 
Disagree 
Neutral 
Agree 32 
Strongly Agree 45 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. 

H) Onshore Wind Resolution 1, Condition 1.5: That the majority are in community ownership, with a democratic process in place to inform the early stages of planning and development (including funding support at this stage). 

Our Proposed Response: Incorporated into Response F, Energy Supply chapter , “Local Plan updates will look to include policies that give positive weight to renewable and low carbon energy initiatives, which have clear evidence of local community involvement and leadership.” 

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Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 11 
Disagree 
Neutral 11 
Agree 24 
Strongly Agree 47 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response.

I) Onshore Wind Resolution 1, Condition 1.6: That energy is not considered in isolation, but alongside consideration of the space available for other land use development (housing, roads, agriculture, business, industry, schools, sewers) within local planning process and strategic planning. 

Our Proposed Response: Incorporated into Response C, Energy Supply chapter , “Identify suitable locations for renewable energy, informed by the emerging Land Use Framework and environmental and social sensitivities, ensuring community involvement, and look to allocate these in Local Plans as appropriate.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 13 
Disagree 
Neutral 16 
Agree 26 
Strongly Agree 42 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. 

J) Onshore Wind Resolution 2: In principle, we support reforming the National Planning Framework to remove the requirement for ‘complete’ community support from development planning applications for onshore wind turbines. 

Our Proposed Response: New action proposed, Energy Supply chapter, “Work with government to amend national planning legislation, in particular footnote 54 which requires complete community support, to make it more straightforward for onshore wind developments to get planning consent, especially those that are community owned.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 12 
Disagree 
Neutral 
Agree 33 
Strongly Agree 37 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. The most frequent themes occurring in the comments were:  

  • Concern that onshore wind could be imposed on communities (12) 
  • Against onshore wind due to impacts on views, nature and the noise they create (4) 
  • Agrees, provided a clear majority of the public support renewable energy development (4) 

K) Onshore Wind Resolution 2,  Condition 2.1: That communities where sites are identified benefit from them, and that they get really good support to engage and understand the issues. 

Our Proposed Response: Incorporated into Action E), Energy Supply chapter , “Provide practical support for communities wishing to develop their own energy infrastructure.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 11 
Agree 19 
Strongly Agree 54 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. 

L) Onshore Wind Resolution 2, Condition 2.2: Onshore wind farms are developed where the energy produced is most needed (e.g. near industrial areas where it can be easily connected to the grid) and that the location of developments is considered in a way that is integrated with other wider considerations for Devon, such as the need for a mix of energy production, land use and respect for areas of outstanding natural beauty. 

Our Proposed Response: Addressed by Response C, Energy Supply chapter , “Identify suitable locations for renewable energy, informed by the emerging Land Use Framework and environmental and social sensitivities, ensuring community involvement, and look to allocate these in Local Plans as appropriate.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 14 
Agree 32 
Strongly Agree 41 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response.

M) Onshore Wind Resolution 2, Condition 2.3: That planning structures are streamlined and operate in favour of community ownership, where profits are reinvested by and for the community. 

Our Proposed Response: Incorporated into Response F, Energy Supply chapter , “Local Plan updates will look to include policies that give positive weight to renewable and low carbon energy initiatives, which have clear evidence of local community involvement and leadership.” 

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Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 11 
Disagree 
Neutral 16 
Agree 19 
Strongly Agree 49 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response.

N) Onshore Wind Resolution 2, Condition 2.4: That the development planning process is sped up and ensures dialogue with communities is a continuing part of this. 

Our Proposed Response: Incorporated into Response F, Energy Supply chapter : “Local Plan updates will look to include policies that give positive weight to renewable and low carbon energy initiatives, which have clear evidence of local community involvement and leadership.” And Response J: “Work with government to amend national planning legislation, in particular footnote 54, which requires complete community support, to make it more straightforward for onshore wind developments to get planning consent, especially those that are community owned.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 11 
Disagree 
Neutral 14 
Agree 28 
Strongly Agree 42 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. 

6.2 Transport and Mobility

We asked respondents the extent to which they agreed or disagreed with the Devon Climate Emergency Partnership’s proposed responses to the Devon Climate Assembly’s resolutions and conditions about what needs to be done to encourage less car use in Devon.  

O) Roads and Mobility, Resolution 1: In principle, we support the ambition in the Interim Devon Carbon Plan to reduce traffic emissions across Devon by making car use less attractive, while maintaining mobility. 

Our Proposed Response: We will introduce a new goal within the Transport chapter of the Devon Carbon Plan: “Traffic emissions are reduced across Devon by providing reliable, regular, affordable and integrated alternatives to private car use in combination with measures to make car use less attractive.” 

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Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 13 
Disagree 
Neutral 
Agree 25 
Strongly Agree 50 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. The most frequent themes occurring in the comments were:  

  • Stressed the need for regular, reliable, integrated and affordable public transport, including in rural areas  (22) 
  • Agreement that private car use needs reducing through providing real alternatives (10) 
  • Stressed the need for cars in a rural county like Devon (7) 
  • Worried about the cost of alternatives to internal-combustion-engine cars, including electric cars and public transport, and the subsequent impact on rural communities and those with low incomes (6) 
  • Better electric vehicle charging infrastructure is needed (4) 
  • Active travel should be prioritised and better routes provided (4) 

P) Roads and Mobility, Resolution 1, Condition 1.1: That there is widespread investment in ensuring that there is a better public and active transport infrastructure across Devon that can be used as a reliable, regular, affordable and integrated alternative, and that significant progress is made on this before the wider implementation of proposals to discourage car use. 

Our Proposed Response: We will incorporate into the supporting text of the Transport chapter that the Assembly has said that significant progress should be made on the active and public transport provision before proposals to discourage car use are introduced. This will guide future transport policy and infrastructure decisions. But, there may be circumstances where proposals to discourage car use are necessary to raise funds, to put the active and public transport measures in place. 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 13 
Agree 31 
Strongly Agree 46 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. The most frequent themes occurring in the comments were:  

  • Stressed the need for regular, reliable, integrated and affordable public transport, including in rural areas (5) 

Q) Roads and Mobility Resolution 1,  Condition 1.2: That there is an independent authority put in place to oversee and ensure accountability in the collection of resources generated by any charging schemes to ensure they are allocated towards public and active travel improvements (and other road emission reduction schemes) and that their findings are regularly reported. 

Our Proposed Response: No action proposed. By law (Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984) the money raised from on-street parking is only allowed to be spent on transport projects. In 2021/22 Devon County Council spent the £4.48m raised from on-street parking on improving active and public transport. Each year this information is published online here. Money raised from off-street car parking is used to fund council services which would otherwise require council tax increases to pay for them. The finances of local authorities are public and are subject to formal Overview and Scrutiny processes and independent, external audit as required by the Local Audit and Accountability Act 2014. 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 11 
Neutral 13 
Agree 39 
Strongly Agree 32 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response.

R) Roads and Mobility Resolution 2: We recognise that there will likely always be a need for private car use in Devon, particularly in rural areas of the county, and support the initiatives included in the Interim Devon Carbon Plan to help minimise the emissions these cause by investing in the infrastructure to support the increased use of electric vehicles. 

Our Proposed Response: No action required because this resolution is already addressed by the IDCP. 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 18 
Agree 30 
Strongly Agree 39 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. The most frequent themes occurring in the comments were:  

  • Concerned about the cost of electric vehicles and that support for those on low incomes must be prioritised, e.g. subsidized access to electric vehicles (18) 
  • Better electric vehicle charging infrastructure is needed (8) 
  • Concerns about the sustainability of electric vehicles (5) 
  • Stressed the need for regular, reliable, integrated and affordable public transport, including in rural areas (5) 
  • There needs to be an emphasis on reduction in car use, as well as a change to electric vehicles.(4) 

S) Roads and Mobility Resolution 3: In principle, we support taking measures to reduce the road space available to cars and reallocate it to active and public travel modes in Devon. 

Our Proposed Response: No action required because this resolution is already addressed by the IDCP. 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 14 
Disagree 11 
Neutral 18 
Agree 27 
Strongly Agree 31 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. The most frequent themes occurring in the comments were:  

  • Stressed the need for cars in a rural county like Devon (7) 
  • Support for increased safe and separate active travel routes (7) 
  • Stressed the need for regular, reliable, integrated and affordable public transport, including in rural areas  (5) 
  • Concerned that reallocating road space will increase congestion and traffic, including on rural lanes (5) 
  • Disagrees that the IDCP adequately responds to this resolution (4) 

T) Roads and Mobility Resolution 3, Condition 3.1: That priority is given to making sure that you can still travel cheaply around Devon, in a similar time to now, via active travel/public transport.  

Our Proposed Response: Update one of the goals in the Transport chapter of the IDCP which includes relevant actions to: “Our streets are safe for all and using active, shared and public transport is efficient and affordable.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 11 
Agree 30 
Strongly Agree 51 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response.

U) Roads and Mobility Resolution 3 Condition 3.2: That there is the provision of more modern and effective park and ride facilities. 

Our Proposed Response: Update existing action in the Transport Chapter, T33, to say “Modernise and create car parks at strategic points to encourage car sharing and onward journeys by active travel or public transport.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 11 
Neutral 16 
Agree 32 
Strongly Agree 35 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response.

V) Roads and Mobility Resolution 3, Condition 3.3: That proper cycling infrastructure is created across the county. 

Our Proposed Response: No action required because this condition is already addressed by the IDCP. 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 22 
Agree 22 
Strongly Agree 47 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. The most frequent themes occurring in the comments were:  

  • Supports the need for enhanced safe cycling infrastructure in Devon (5) 

W) Roads and Mobility Resolution 3, Condition 3.4: That there is differentiation in public transport fares depending on user categories (e.g. discounted fares for residents and/or means tested travel passes). 

Our Proposed Response: New action proposed, Transport chapter : “Explore opportunities to set fares to support equal opportunities to access mobility for all.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 18 
Agree 42 
Strongly Agree 29 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. The most frequent themes occurring in the comments were:  

  • Stressed the need for regular, reliable, integrated and affordable public transport, including in rural areas  (5)

X) Roads and Mobility Resolution 3, Condition 3.5: That Devon investigates introducing a Tourist Levy: where the tax on tourists visiting is allocated to the local community to fund initiatives to reduce carbon emissions. 

Our Proposed Response: New action proposed, Transport chapter, “Investigate the concept and mechanisms of a Tourist Levy, including careful consideration of its impact on local businesses, to enable visitors to contribute to the transition to net-zero.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 13 
Disagree 15 
Neutral 15 
Agree 21 
Strongly Agree 36 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. The most frequent themes occurring in the comments were:  

  • Concerned about the hostile message this sends and the impact on Devon’s economy, to which tourism plays an important contribution (6) 

Y) Roads and Mobility Resolution 4: We recognise that there is the need to introduce some ‘financial sticks’, like parking charges, congestion charges and parking levies in order to help fund the provision of wider improvements, ‘the carrots’, that will help reduce emissions while maintaining mobility across Devon. 

Our Proposed Response: No action proposed as not supported by more than 50% of the Devon Climate Assembly. 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 21 
Disagree 12 
Neutral 23 
Agree 24 
Strongly Agree 20 

Whilst only 44% responded that they either “Agree” or “Strongly Agree” with the proposed response, 23% stated they were “Neutral”. Only 33% said they “Disagree” or “Strongly Disagree” with the proposed response.  

The most frequent themes occurring in the comments were:  

  • Thinks the recommendation from the Assembly should be taken forward in light of the climate emergency (13) 
  • Instead of financial sticks, offer sufficient incentives to make alternatives attractive, such as cheaper and better public and active travel (6) 
  • Concern that increases in the cost of transport impacts local towns and businesses, encouraging online shopping (5) 
  • Affordable and safe alternatives need to be in place before disincentives are introduced (5) 
  • The measures should be paid for by those who can afford it (4) 
  • Rural communities need cars to access work and facilities and concern they will be further disadvantaged (4) 
  • It is reasonable and necessary to ask individual car owners to pay for the use, and associated costs, of occupying public space through parking, and individual car use should be reframed as a privilege and a luxury (4) 
  • Concern that the most disadvantaged must not be disadvantaged further (4) 
  • Believes the measures are undemocratic (4) 

Z) Roads and Mobility Resolution 5: In principle, we support taking measures to reduce space available for parking and introduce parking charges in areas across Devon. 

Our Proposed Response: Less than 50% of the Assembly supported this resolution. However, some local authorities in Devon are already reducing the space available for parking to make streetscapes and active travel more attractive. This must continue where appropriate. New action proposed, Transport chapter : “Reduce the space available for parking where appropriate to make streetscapes and active travel more attractive.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 20 
Disagree 13 
Neutral 15 
Agree 27 
Strongly Agree 26 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. The most frequent themes occurring in the comments were:  

  • Stressed the need for regular, reliable, integrated and affordable public transport, including in rural areas  (14) 
  • Concern about the impacts on local towns and businesses (9) 
  • This disadvantages those who are dependent on their cars due to lack of access to alternatives, such as rural communities (6) 
  • Believes this will make existing problems with on road parking worse, especially in areas where houses don’t have their own parking spaces (5) 
  • Believes there should be more parking and fees should not be increased (13) 
  • Believes parking costs should be increased, particularly for out-of-town sites, including supermarkets (6) 
  • It will result in greater competition for spaces and if drivers struggle to find spaces this will result in them driving around for longer, causing higher emissions (5) 
  • Concern that this will affect those on low incomes most (4) 
  • We still need cars, particularly in rural areas (17) 

Aa) Roads and Mobility Resolution 5, Condition 5.1: That parking charges are ringfenced and reinvested in the public transport network to reduce the public’s resistance to paying parking fees. 

Our Proposed Response: No action proposed as this condition is already being met through existing legislation. By law (Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984) the money raised from on-street parking is only allowed to be spent on transport projects. In 2021/22 Devon County Council spent the £4.48m raised from on-street parking on improving active and public transport. Each year this information is published online here. Money raised from off-street car parking is used to fund council services which would otherwise require council tax increases to pay for them. The finances of local authorities are public and are subject to formal Overview and Scrutiny processes and independent, external audit as required by the Local Audit and Accountability Act 2014. 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 29 
Agree 37 
Strongly Agree 29 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response.

Ab) Roads and Mobility, Resolution 5, Condition 5.2: That there are differentiated parking charges based on:  a) type of vehicles (electric / polluting); and  b) users’ needs (e.g. essential work use, people with limited mobility) 

Our Proposed Response: No action proposed, as there is little evidence that having more expensive parking charges for more polluting vehicles leads to people changing their behaviour. Such a system would be expensive to implement and enforce. Parking solutions to support people with specific needs are already available. 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 19 
Neutral 19 
Agree 22 
Strongly Agree 32 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response.

Ac) Roads and Mobility Resolution 6: In principle, we support the introduction of workplace parking levies in areas across Devon.  

Our Proposed Response: Workplace parking levies are not progressed as they did not receive majority support from the Devon Climate Assembly. But we are offering an alternative action, as employers, including anchor institutions, can voluntarily help achieve the social, economic and health benefits from more active and less polluting transport without the need for a workplace parking levy and the perceived negative impacts for employees. New action proposed, Transport chapter: “Employers to be encouraged and supported to make commuting by active, shared and public transport more attractive.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 15 
Disagree 13 
Neutral 16 
Agree 29 
Strongly Agree 27 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. The most frequent themes occurring in the comments were:  

  • Support for increased home working and meetings online, enabled by high quality broadband (6) 
  • Concerned that this will affect those on low incomes and may limit job opportunities and social mobility (4) 
  • Stressed the need for regular, reliable, integrated and affordable public transport, including in rural areas  (4) 
  • Workplace parking levies are only fair for those with viable alternative transport options, i.e. not rural communities and commuters (4) 

Ad) Roads and Mobility Resolution 6, Condition 6.1: That money gained from Workplace Parking Levies is spent on supporting public transport routes, or viable alternatives for employees, including employers providing shuttle busses for workers or paying for bike hubs and shower facilities at workplaces.  

Our Proposed Response: Workplace parking levies are not progressed as they did not receive majority support from the Devon Climate Assembly. 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 11 
Neutral 40 
Agree 31 
Strongly Agree 11 

Whilst only 42% said they “Agree” or “Strongly Agree” with the proposed response, 40% said they were “Neutral”. The most common reason for selecting Neutral was because the Condition did not receive more than 50% support from the Assembly. 

The most frequent themes occurring in the comments were:  

  • Thinks that we should continue to investigate workplace parking levies (4)

Ae) Roads and Mobility Resolution 6, Condition 6.2: That it only applies to businesses with a certain level of turnover and/or a certain number of staff (level to be determined based on learning from successful models elsewhere). 

Our Proposed Response: Whilst this condition received strong support, it is not being taken forward as Resolution 6 on workplace parking levies did not receive majority support from the Devon Climate Assembly. 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 12 
Neutral 50 
Agree 29 
Strongly Agree 

Whilst only 32% said they “Agree” or “Strongly Agree” with the proposed response, 50% said they were “Neutral”. No comments were provided by those responding Neutral to help understand this further.  

Af) Roads and Mobility Resolution 6, Condition 6.3: That it is the employer who pays and the cost cannot be passed on to the employee.  

Our Proposed Response: Whilst this condition received a good level of support, it is not being taken forward as Resolution 6 on workplace parking levies did not receive majority support from the Devon Climate Assembly. 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 12 
Neutral 41 
Agree 29 
Strongly Agree 

Whilst only 38% said they “Agree” or “Strongly Agree” with the proposed response, 41% said they were “Neutral”. No comments were provided by those responding Neutral to help understand this further.

Ag) Roads and Mobility Resolution 7: In principle, we support introducing congestion charges and low emission zones in areas across Devon.  

Our Proposed Response: New action proposed, Transport chapter, “Review the potential for the introduction of congestion charges and low emission zones in appropriate areas across Devon on a place-by-place basis, giving consideration to local impacts and likely effectiveness.” 

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Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 16 
Disagree 
Neutral 13 
Agree 34 
Strongly Agree 27 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. The most frequent themes occurring in the comments were:  

  • Concern that this will disproportionately affect those on lower incomes and in rural communities (9) 
  • Worried that congestion charges and low emissions zones will negatively impact the local economy (6) 
  • Concerned about additional costs to individuals, especially given the current economic context (5) 
  • Stressed the need for regular, reliable, integrated and affordable public transport, including in rural areas (5) 
  • Would like to see stronger wording and action than ‘review the potential’ (5)

Ah) Roads and Mobility Resolution 7, Condition 7.1: That they won’t be introduced as a ‘one size fits all’ approach for all areas of the county and groups of people.  

Our Proposed Response: Incorporated into Action Ag, Transport chapter : “Review the potential for the introduction of congestion charges and low emission zones in appropriate areas across Devon on a place-by-place basis, giving consideration to local impacts and likely effectiveness.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 11 
Disagree 
Neutral 19 
Agree 28 
Strongly Agree 36 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response.

Ai) Roads and Mobility Resolution 7, Condition 7.2: That there is careful consideration, and review, of the economic impact on the area. 

Our Proposed Response: Incorporated into action Ag, Transport chapter : “Review the potential for the introduction of congestion charges and low emission zones in appropriate areas across Devon on a place-by-place basis, giving consideration to local impacts and likely effectiveness.”  

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Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 25 
Agree 25 
Strongly Agree 36 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. 

6.3 Building Retrofit

We asked respondents the extent to which they agreed or disagreed with the Devon Climate Emergency Partnership’s proposed responses to the Devon Climate Assembly’s resolutions and conditions about what would be the best way of encouraging, or requiring, people to retrofit their homes, properties or business premises to reduce carbon emissions.  

Aj) Buildings Resolution 1: We believe that the existing financial supports available across Devon are not effective for encouraging people to undertake the degree of retrofitting work in their properties that will be required to meet net zero targets. 

Our Proposed Response: Resolution 1 is addressed by Response Ak: “Explore opportunities to enhance financial support available for people to retrofit their properties, both locally and with national government.”  

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 
Agree 29 
Strongly Agree 62 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. The most frequent themes occurring in the comments were:  

  • Retrofit is currently unaffordable for most people and will require financial support (14) 
  • Make quality, trustworthy, advice and information on retrofit and its advantages more easily available (6) 
  • All new builds should be net zero and incorporate renewables where possible (5) 
  • Thinks that there should be greater support and action from National Government and that local government should communicate this clearly (5) 

Ak) Buildings Resolution 2: In principle, we support there being financial support available for people to retrofit properties across Devon.  

Our Proposed Response: We will replace the existing action B3 in the Interim Devon Carbon Plan (IDCP) with: “Explore opportunities to enhance financial support available for people to retrofit their properties, both locally and with national government.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 
Agree 29 
Strongly Agree 59 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. 

AI) Buildings Resolution 2, Supporting Recommendation 2.1: There needs to be more accountability and reporting regarding government expenditure on retrofitting, with ongoing progress reports that show the money spent and progress towards meeting targets.  

Our Proposed Response: To fulfil this supporting recommendation, the monitoring indicators for the Carbon Plan will be updated to include indicators for: “Amount of funding spent through dedicated public grants on domestic retrofitting in Devon” and “Amount of funding spent through dedicated public grants on commercial retrofitting in Devon.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 11 
Agree 39 
Strongly Agree 47 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response.

AM) Buildings Resolution 2, Supporting Recommendation 2.2: There needs to be widespread education and awareness raising about:  a ) the climate emergency;  b) what actions authorities are taking; and  c) what people can do to retrofit and improve energy efficiency and what impact that will have.  

Our Proposed Response: No additional responses are proposed as, part A of this supporting recommendation is covered by proposed response B): “Provide high quality, objective information and education for communities about the crisis nature of the climate emergency and the need for, and benefits of, renewable energy production.” Part B is already delivered through the Devon Climate Emergency communication channels resourced by a full-time communications officer and new staff resources in the partner organisations. Part C is already included in the Built Environment Chapter of the IDCP by actions B5 and B6. 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 25 
Agree 36 
Strongly Agree 33 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response.

An) Buildings Resolution 2, Supporting Recommendation 2.3: There needs to be a centralised, Devon based, source of high-quality information regarding measures that can be taken on properties and the types of support available to people to undertake them.  

Our Proposed Response: No action required because this supporting recommendation is already addressed by the IDCP. 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 26 
Agree 29 
Strongly Agree 40 
Total 100 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. 

Ao) Buildings Resolution 2, Supporting Recommendation 2.4: There needs to be personalised advice available about options for your home and any financial support you are eligible for. 

Our Proposed Response: No action required because this supporting recommendation is already addressed by the IDCP. 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 21 
Agree 38 
Strongly Agree 41 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response.

Ap) Buildings Resolution 2, Supporting Recommendation 2.5: All authorities need to demonstrate ambition and allocate significant budget to retrofitting.  

Our Proposed Response: Local authorities don’t have existing resources for retrofitting, so we will need to work with government on this. Therefore, this is addressed by proposed response Ak: “Explore opportunities to enhance financial support available for people to retrofit their properties, both locally and with national government.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 14 
Agree 32 
Strongly Agree 49 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response.

Aq) Buildings Resolution 2, Supporting Recommendation 2.6: More focus needs to be given to ensuring the availability of green mortgages.  

Our Proposed Response: New action proposed, Economy and Resources chapter: “Work with government to enhance the availability and awareness of green mortgages.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 29 
Agree 43 
Strongly Agree 26 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response.

Ar) & As) Buildings Resolution 3: In principle, we support the use of regulation to require people to retrofit their home. 

Our Proposed Response: New actions proposed, Built Environment chapter : “Evaluate the use of planning conditions to require energy-efficiency upgrades at the time of extending a home, and any other local regulatory opportunities that arise.” And: “Work with government to explore additional mechanisms to require energy-efficiency upgrades.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 11 
Neutral 11 
Agree 28 
Strongly Agree 43 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. The most frequent themes occurring in the comments were:  

  • Thinks this is an intrusion on people’s freedom (10) 
  • New builds should be built to higher energy efficiency standards and the NPPF must be changed to allow local authorities to insist on this (6) 
  • This should be considered on a case by case basis, dependent on the reasons behind the extension and the ability to pay. Or else it will disadvantage those on lower incomes or the disabled (5) 

At) Buildings, Resolution 3, Condition 3.1: That there is recognition that buildings are not all the same. The requirement, and any support to do it, needs to be targeted so the poorest rated buildings are done first.  

Our Proposed Response: This will be described in the supporting text for Response As), with the caveat that such schemes should also be means tested if they are to contribute to a just transition. Built Environment chapter, action As): “Work with government to explore additional mechanisms to require energy-efficiency upgrades.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 17 
Agree 34 
Strongly Agree 46 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response.

Au) Buildings Resolution 3, Condition 3.2: That affordability is taken into account.  

Our Proposed Response: We will update Principle 9a to say: “A just and affordable transition is required to ensure that vulnerable and low-income segments of society and rural communities are not disadvantaged.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 16 
Agree 19 
Strongly Agree 59 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. 

Av) Buildings Resolution 3, Condition 3.3: That VAT is removed from specialist items used for retrofitting.  

Our Proposed Response: No action required because this condition is already addressed by the IDCP. 

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Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 25 
Agree 25 
Strongly Agree 50 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. 

Aw) Buildings Resolution 3, Condition 3.4: That DIY is encouraged, with experts then able to undertake an assessment of impacts and approve reduced tax rates.  

Our Proposed Response: We will update action B6 in the Built Environment chapter of the IDCP to say: “B6. Establish a Devon-wide energy advice service that links home-owners, landlords and tenants with DIY guidance, independent assessors, skilled installers and market offers.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 16 
Agree 32 
Strongly Agree 41 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response.

Ax) Buildings Resolution 4: In principle, we support introducing policies in Devon that use planning permission to trigger the need for retrofitting measures.  

Our Proposed Response: No additional response required, as this is addressed by the proposed Response Ar, Built Environment chapter: “Evaluate the use of planning conditions to require energy-efficiency upgrades at the time of extending a home, and any other local regulatory opportunities that arise.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 20 
Agree 33 
Strongly Agree 36 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. The most frequent themes occurring in the comments were:  

  • Thinks this is an intrusion on people’s freedom (6) 

Ay) Buildings Resolution 4, Condition 4.1: That conservatories and permitted buildings should be included.  

Our Proposed Response: No additional response required, as this condition is addressed by the proposed Response Ar), Built Environment chapter : “Evaluate the use of planning conditions to require energy-efficiency upgrades at the time of extending a home, and any other local regulatory opportunities that arise.” Conservatories will be mentioned in the supporting text for Response Ar). Permitted buildings by definition do not need planning permission and so could not be covered by this mechanism. 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 25 
Agree 50 
Strongly Agree 19 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response.

Az) Buildings Resolution 4, Condition 4.2: That the extent of retrofitting required by the planning permission would be in proportion to the size of the house and extension.  

Our Proposed Response: We will address this condition by covering it in the supporting text for Response Ar), Built Environment chapter : “Evaluate the use of planning conditions to require energy-efficiency upgrades at the time of extending a home, and any other local regulatory opportunities that arise.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 20 
Agree 54 
Strongly Agree 23 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response.

Ba) Buildings Resolution 4, Condition 4.3: That the energy consumption of the whole property needs to be reduced, in proportion to the size of the extension / alteration.  

Our Proposed Response: We will address this condition by covering it in the supporting text for Response Ar), Built Environment chapter: “Evaluate the use of planning conditions to require energy-efficiency upgrades at the time of extending a home, and any other local regulatory opportunities that arise.” 

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Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 23 
Agree 49 
Strongly Agree 23 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response.

Bb) Buildings Resolution 5. In principle, we support introducing policies in Devon that link Council Tax and Business Rates to energy efficiency performance.  

Our Proposed Response: New action proposed, Built Environment chapter: “Work with government to continue exploring the use of Council Tax and Business Rates to encourage energy efficiency upgrades of buildings.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 11 
Disagree 11 
Neutral 17 
Agree 34 
Strongly Agree 28 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. The most frequent themes occurring in the comments were:  

  • Concern that this will disadvantage those least able to pay for building retrofit, to increase the efficiency of their property (15) 
  • Landlords should be required to take greater action on retrofit, as well as there being support for renters (5) 
  • Concern that this would penalise people living in older buildings which are difficult to retrofit (4) 
  • Thinks this is an intrusion on people’s freedom (4) 

Bc) Buildings Resolution 5, Condition 5.1: That there is also a requirement on private landlords and social housing providers to bring properties up to a minimum level of energy efficiency.  

Our Proposed Response: No action required because this condition is already addressed by the IDCP. 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 17 
Agree 23 
Strongly Agree 54 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. 

Bd) Buildings Resolution 5, Condition 5.2: That there is a simple and consistent way for the effect of energy efficiency improvements to be verified by the Council before discounts are applied.  

Our Proposed Response: This would be essential to the operation of a successful scheme. This requirement will be mentioned in the supporting text for Response Bb), Built Environment chapter: “Work with government to continue exploring the use of Council Tax and Business Rates to encourage energy efficiency upgrades of buildings.” 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 17 
Agree 47 
Strongly Agree 28 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. 

Be) Buildings Resolution 5, Condition 5.3: That Councils promote widely the opportunity to benefit from reductions in Council tax and business rates by increasing the energy efficiency of your property. 

Our Proposed Response: No action at this time as law changes are required for this to occur, which will be pursued by Response Bb), Built Environment chapter: “Work with government to continue exploring the use of Council Tax and Business Rates to encourage energy efficiency upgrades of buildings.” The promotion of such a scheme would be implemented by the Devon Energy Efficiency Advice Service if it were deemed appropriate after being explored further with government. 

Respondent’s opinion on DCE’s proposed response  % of Respondents 
Strongly Disagree 
Disagree 
Neutral 18 
Agree 35 
Strongly Agree 29 

The majority of respondents agreed with the proposed response. The most frequent themes occurring in the comments were:  

  • Concern that this will disadvantage those least able to pay for building retrofit, to increase the efficiency of their property (4) 

 

Your responses will inform how the resolutions and conditions of the Devon Climate Assembly are incorporated into the Final Devon Carbon Plan.  

The Final Devon Carbon Plan is on schedule to be presented to the Devon Climate Emergency partnership in August 2022, ready to be formally adopted by the partner organisations. All other organisations and individuals in Devon will also be invited to adopt the Devon Carbon Plan, which will be available on our website. 

In the meantime, the Devon Climate Emergency partners are taking action. You can keep up to date on the website at www.devonclimateemergency.org.uk/taking-action, join our mailing list at www.devonclimateemergency.org.uk/join  and follow our social media channels.  

Apps 

Next Door app  

Email 

Library  

Meetings 

Local Nature Partnership meeting 

Newsletters and bulletins 

County Council newsletter (online) 

Council Member newsletter 

Devon County Council Connect Me 

Devon Climate Emergency newsletter 

Devon Wildlife Trust newsletter 

East Devon District Council newsletter 

Exmouth newsletter 

Mid Devon District Council newsletter 

Parish magazine 

Teignbridge District Council newsletter 

A piece by John Hart in Journal 

Newspaper article (paper not stated) 

Organisations 

Devon Association of Local Councils 

Tavistock Transition Town 

Parish Council 

Work 

Radio (station not stated) 

Websites 

Devon County Council website 

Devon Climate Emergency website 

Devon news centre 

Tunbridge website 

Work intranet 

Council website (council not specified) 

Word of Mouth 

Devon County Council Staff